At work, we all want to feel safe in the knowledge that our employers have done everything they can to keep us safe. But what are the rights of an employee when it comes to health and safety at work? If you are an employer in the UK, there are five things you must provide your employees.

1.       Written Statement of the Main Duties of the Job

All UK employers must issue employees with a written statement of terms and conditions or documentation that details their exact rights within the workplace.

The written statement of the job should include a detailed list of the main duties the employee is expected to carry out. The list should be in such a way that someone who knows nothing about the business would understand the employee’s role in the organisation. Doing this will allow the employee to have a clear understanding of what is expected of them in their day-to-day working life.

2.       Liability Insurance

If you are an employer/business owner, you need to have the right insurance in place. You are responsible for the health and safety of your employees, so if an accident occurs at work or a public liability claim is made against your business, who will protect your assets?

Businesses who fail to insure their staff for a workplace injury can find themselves taken to court and sued by their own employees. Employer’s liability insurance is a legal requirement, and having this cover will allow you t make sure that your employees are well protected in all instances.

3.       Adequate Breaks During Work Hours

Employees are entitled to fair breaks during their workday. Employees are entitled to both daily and weekly breaks from their work. Workers are allowed a daily break of at least 20 minutes if their working day exceeds 6 hours, although most employers allow staff a one-hour lunch break.

Employees are also allowed at least one full day off every seven days. In most non-retail or healthcare jobs, employees will be given the weekend off.

4.       An Employment Contract

A contract of employment is a significant legal document that sets the boundaries of an employee’s relationship with their employer. An employment contract is vital to managing the risks associated with any hire.

It is an agreement between you and your employer, which covers your working time, wages, where you work and companies’ information, as well as detailing things like notice periods and disciplinary action.

5.       Pension enrollment

If you employ someone in the UK, it is your responsibility to make sure that they join a workplace pension scheme (if they’re not already in one).

The law requires all employers to automatically enrol workers into a workplace pension unless they are eligible for an exemption. Workers can opt-out of being enrolled into the pension scheme, but this must be done via a written statement.

While they are in your employee, a worker’s health and safety is your responsibility. There are several things that you can do to make sure your employees are healthy and happy at work, and these are just a few of these ways.